Course Descriptions HIST 5000   Directed Readings.*
CREDIT HOURS: 3


HIST 5001   Directed Readings II.*
CREDIT HOURS: 3

FORMAT COMMENTS: This is a class of individual instruction.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may only register for this course with the permission of a Faculty member and the Graduate Coordinator.

HIST 5004   Nature and Romanticism
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Kant's "Copernican Revolution" in philosophy, ironically, marked a resurrection of a full-blown "idealist" philosophy of nature. This course will investigate the attempts of Kant's followers to construct a natural philosophy and its engagement with the rival mechanical world picture. It explores the implications of this endeavor for the growth of romanticism, vitalism, and our modern picture of "nature." It begins with an examination of the ambiguous heritage presented by Kant's writings on nature and proceeds through the attempts to develop a complete program of idealist "naturphilosophie" and its spread throughout European thought by the medium of romanticist art and natural philosophy.
FORMAT: Seminar
CROSS-LISTING: HSTC 4300.03

HIST 5007   The European Enlightenment
CREDIT HOURS: 3
The seminar examines eighteenth-century European Enlightenment and continuing controversies over its interpretations and legacies. Class discussions focus on Enlightenment debates on religion, gender, science, non-European people, society and government, and the possible impact of the Enlightenment on the French Revolution.
FORMAT: Seminar
EXCLUSIONS: HIST 3007.03

HIST 5045   The French Revolution
CREDIT HOURS: 3
The seminar will focus on the current interpretations of the French Revolution. Each time the seminar is offered, it may focus on a specific theme related to the French Revolution, for example, the historiography of its origins, the Terror or the legacy of the French Revolution for modern political culture.
FORMAT: Seminar

HIST 5056   Fascist and National Socialist Movements in Europe, 1900-1945
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Between the World Wars, virtually every European country had one or more groups that considered themselves or were considered fascist: in Germany and Italy, of course, but also in France, Spain, Hungary, Romania, and elsewhere. The seminar will explore the ideals, experiences, aspirations and political realities of the simultaneously threatening and fascinating historical problem.
FORMAT: Seminar
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 3053.03

HIST 5060   Topics in the Civilization of Baroque Italy
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Emphasizes the techniques and methods of studying history from archival sources in the Italian context, circa 1570-1740. Areas to be explored are Baroque Catholicism, social interaction, social status and display court culture, standards of living, routine infanticide, historical ecology and geography. Substantial use of translated and transcribed archival sources. Requires reading knowledge of French.
FORMAT: Seminar
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 4060.03

HIST 5061   Prelates, Peasants and Primates: From Italian History to the Behavioral Sciences
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Prelates Peasants and Primates is a directed readings course with an interest in the social sciences as they apply to historical societies. Weekly readings of articles and chapters of books drawn from works of sociology, evolutionary psychology, primate ethology, social psychology, and anthropology. Requires reading knowledge of French.
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Tutorial

CROSS-LISTING: HIST 4061.03

HIST 5090   Russian Society
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Basic institutions of 20th century Russian society are considered in their historical context, with special attention to the former role of the Party, official culture and literature, the workings of the economy, and social stratification. RECOMMENDED: RUSN 1000.06, 2000.06
FORMAT: Seminar
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 3090.03, RUSN 3090.03

HIST 5091   Soviet History Seminar
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This is an advanced seminar on the history of Soviet Russia from 1917 to 1991. We will explore the origins, mechanisms, costs, and outcome of perhaps the most ambitious and tragic historic experiment at creating a modern yet equitable society in a country far from conducive to such an undertaking.
FORMAT: Seminar
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 4090.03, RUSN 4090.03

HIST 5104   Punishment, Crime, and the Courts in Early Modern England, c. 1550-1850
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course explores the nature and development of the English criminal justice system during the period in which it first began to be exported to other areas, and at home had to deal with the turmoil wrought by reformation, war, and industrialization. This course will examine the uses of law – did it act in the interests of particular people or groups, and if so, how? Historians have argued that the law had both coercive and symbolic purposes – that it served to enforce and legitimize social and economic structures. We will examine these arguments and their implications. Classes will progress thematically rather than chronologically; some will be devoted to a particular type of punishment, some to the different groups of people involved in the legal process, and others to historical debates.
FORMAT: Seminar

HIST 5105   The English Civil War: Society, Religion and Politics 1603-1660
CREDIT HOURS: 3
An advanced course on one of the most tumultuous and eventful periods in British history, leading up to and including civil war and revolution 1642 to 1660. Select primary sources will be used in addition to secondary works. Topics to be studied include the social structure of early Stuart England; the Church and its critics; foreign policy; radical politics; religious sectarianism; and the impact of the war and its aftermath on the populace.
FORMAT: Seminar
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 3105.03

HIST 5106   Topics in Early Modern English History
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Topics will vary from year to year, but may include the religious reformations, print culture, political protest, and state formation. The course will offer students the opportunity to examine in depth key features of the history and historiography of sixteenth and early seventeenth century England.
FORMAT: Seminar
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 4106.03

HIST 5117   Winston Churchill
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course focuses on major controversies and events in British and world history in which Winston Churchill was a leading actor. It will examine the historiography of these subjects, and the impact of Churchill's own writing in shaping the historical record.
FORMAT: Seminar
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 4117.03

HIST 5222   Topics in Canadian Social History
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This seminar will explore major themes in Canadian social development. The topics discussed will vary from year to year but will emphasize such themes as: changing values in Canadian society; the nature of popular cultures; the relationship of order and disorder; the family; gender relations; and social classes. Approved with Canadian Studies.
FORMAT: Seminar
EXCLUSIONS: HIST 3222.03, HIST 4222.03

HIST 5250   Popular Culture in the Atlantic World, 1650 to 1800
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course examines the history of popular culture in the Atlantic world. It focuses on using primary sources, such as diaries and journals, to explore the culture and customs in pre-industrial communities. We will discuss topics such as family relationships, popular ideologies, religious practices and economic discussions. Students will present drafts of their research papers in class, and a revised version of the paper will be submitted at the end of term.
FORMAT: Seminar
PREREQUISITES: Instructor's permission
EXCLUSIONS: HIST 4250.03

HIST 5300   Topics in Latin American History
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This seminar course examines a select theme in Latin American history. The specific theme varies from year to year. Possible topics include race and nation, gender and sexuality, or political radicalism. The bulk of the work involves preparation of a significant research paper and discussion of weekly readings.
FORMAT: Seminar
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 4300

HIST 5400   Topics in African History
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course will undertake a careful, in depth examination of a select theme in African history. The theme will vary from year to year, but the aim will be to probe the deep complexities of Africa’s past that recent scholarship is bringing to light. Themes may be regional or continental,and could include such topics as witchcraft, resistance, urban history, religious change, migration, or nationalism. The core of the work will be a significant research paper and seminar presentations. Courses will also involve the reading, presentation, and discussion of selected readings.
FORMAT: Seminar
EXCLUSIONS: HIST 4400.03

HIST 5401   State Violence, Communal Conflict and Criminality in Modern South Africa
CREDIT HOURS: 3
South Africa is plagued by one of the world's highest rates of violent crime and social conflict. Despite the unprecedented level of public concern with violence, little attention is paid to the historical origins of this phenomenon. This course explores the changing patterns of crime and violence since the 1890s.
FORMAT: Seminar
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 4401.03

HIST 5404   Crime and Punishment in Modern Africa
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course will interrogate the extent to which questions of state legitimacy and power can illuminate the trajectories of crime, policing and punishment from the early colonial era in Africa to the present day.
FORMAT: Seminar
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 4404