Course Descriptions MGMT 2902   Innovation: An Introduction to Design Thinking
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Ever wonder how great ideas turn into innovative solutions people, organizations or communities want to adopt? In today's highly dynamic workplaces, innovation has become not only a priority, but a driving force in the pursuit of financial returns, competitive edge and social impact / social good. Moreover, employers such as Pixar, AirBnb, the Government of Canada and the United Nations, to name a few, have identified the ability to promote innovation and engage in creative practices as essential competencies for their employees and future leaders. Many of these organizations adopt an approach to innovative problem solving called Design Thinking. Design Thinking’s mindset, process and rich collection of methods emphasize the importance of keeping an understanding of people and communities at the core of problem-solving efforts. A design thinking exercise offers the promise of producing ideas and solutions that are desirable for the user (of a product or service), customer or community. This course will explore what we mean when use the word innovation and its relevance to today’s organizations and workforce. We will devote some time to understanding barriers to creativity, the impact of these barriers to innovative pursuits and how they might be overcome. Finally, we will take an in-depth look at Design Thinking – its foundations, methods, and challenges with execution. This course combines theory and application. It provides students with a hands-on practical learning experience in which they will experiment with how design thinking can be used to develop solutions to real-world problems.
FORMAT: Lecture
PREREQUISITES: At least second-year standing

MGMT 3001   Research Methods and Applied Data Analytics
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Informed management decisions rely on high-quality knowledge, information, and data. This course will provide the knowledge and skills required to define a problem, identify a method to inform that problem, collect quantitative and qualitative data, and analyze collected data in concert with existing data sets to reach a resolution. This course emphasizes critical thinking, applied skills, and the use of advanced data analytic tools to derive value from raw data.
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Lab

LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 1.5
LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 1.5
PREREQUISITES: MGMT 2605 or HAHP 3100

MGMT 3201   Financial Management
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is an introduction to the techniques and core principles for making optimal financial decisions for profit, not for profit and public sector organizations. The emphasis is on understanding the role of finance in an integrated management framework. Concepts covered include stakeholder analysis, financial planning, valuation and triple bottom line analysis.
FORMAT: Lecture
PREREQUISITES: At least third-year standing
EXCLUSIONS: COMM 2202.03 and COMM 2203.03

MGMT 3204   Risk Management
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is designed to be a holistic class on risk management. Risk is defined as "the possibility that bad or good things may happen". While centered on risk and uncertainty management in the context of business, it will cover a range of risk management ideas, tactics and strategies that are relevant to policy, environmental management, health care, media and communications management, development and other areas in which risk management plays a role.
FORMAT: Online Delivery
PREREQUISITES: 2nd year standing

MGMT 3308   Managing the Family Enterprise
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Managing the Family Enterprise is about the special problems and issues that confront family businesses. It explores the family system, the business system, the ownership system and their interactions - functional and dysfunctional. Specific topics, examined from the family business perspective, include: the decision to join a family firm, management succession, ownership succession, the role of key non-family employees, strategic planning and other issues especially relevant for family firms. The course also addresses conflict and communication in the family and business. The course has two purposes. First it provides an organized framework for students to understand the dynamics and special issues of family firms. Second it is designed to allow students to explore their interest in joining a family firm. Therefore, it is especially intended for students who come from families which are in business or for students considering joining a family business. Others who wish to explore a key segment of Canadian business are also welcome. The course relies on field projects, guest speakers, case studies, videos, research papers and extensive class discussion to explore the territory of managing family businesses.
FORMAT: Lecture
PREREQUISITES: MGMT 1101.03 and at least third year standing
CROSS-LISTING: COMM 3308.03
EXCLUSIONS: BUSI 6006.03

MGMT 3309   Management Skills Development
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course will expose students to key knowledge, behaviours, skills, competencies and attitudes considered critical to managerial success. The course is designed to provide students with knowledge and an applied focus which will help ensure they understand and apply effective management practices. Topic areas include: understanding what the successful manager needs to know, understanding the personal self, communications, interpersonal negotiations, team skills, managing innovation and change, handling conflict and anger, coaching, and leadership skills and attitudes needed for success. Significant amounts of classroom time will be devoted to putting theory into practice through employing exercises, role plays, case studies, and group discussions.
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Discussion
  • Experiential Learning

PREREQUISITES: MGMT 2304.03 or COMM 2303.03 and at least third-year standing
CROSS-LISTING: COMM 3309.03

MGMT 3320   Organizational Theory
CREDIT HOURS: 3
The goal of this course will be to prepare students to design and structure organizations to be more effective and create value. How organizational structures are designed and driven by strategy, technology, culture, and forces in their internal and external environment will be primary areas of foci. Change management theory, practices, models, and frameworks that are useful for assessing and increasing organizational effectiveness will also be covered. The course will be structured around a combination of lectures, student presentations, group work, in-class discussions, and experiential exercises.
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Discussion
  • Experiential Learning

LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
PREREQUISITES: MGMT 2304.03
CROSS-LISTING: COMM 3320
EXCLUSIONS: COMM 4306

MGMT 3400   Introduction to Real Estate Management
CREDIT HOURS: 3
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the varied aspects of property management in the Canadian environment. Topics include: Residential Management, Building Operations, Environmental Programs and Initiatives, Facility Management, Law and the Lease, and Site Development.
FORMAT: Lecture
PREREQUISITES: MGMT 1101.03 and MGMT 3201.03 or COMM 1101.03, COMM 2202.03 and COMM 2203.03

MGMT 3501   Operations Management
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course introduces the student to some of the standard techniques used in managing operations in manufacturing, services, as well as not-for profit organizations. Topics include: forecasting, inventory, supply chains, production planning, project management, quality and queueing. Cases and class examples are used to build general skills, illustrate the application of techniques and general approaches to managing operations in the public and private sector.
PREREQUISITES: MGMT 1101.03, MGMT 1501.03, MGMT 1601.03, MGMT 2401.03
EXCLUSIONS: COMM 3501.03

MGMT 3511   Management Information Systems
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Information is a key resource for organizations and professionals. Innovative uses of information are often keys to survival in an increasingly competitive and digital economy. Information systems enable these users and account for an increasing larger share of assets in most organizations. The ability to harness and manage these systems demands a sound understanding of a broad range of concepts, terms, and challenging issues dealing with technologies and strategies. This course is designed to help students acquire these essential skills and become an effective client, user, and manager of these systems. Specifically, the course will help students understand the fundamentals of what, how and why information systems are used in organizations and the technologies that enables them. In addition to lecture materials and theoretical frameworks, students will be exposed to real information systems such as SAP and Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems and Business Analytics tools via hands-on lab work and exercises.
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Lab
  • Discussion
  • Experiential Learning

PREREQUISITES: MGMT 1302.03 and at least second-year standing
CROSS-LISTING: COMM 3511.03

MGMT 3601   Information in a Networked World
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course provides an introduction to the economic, political, and social dimensions of today's networked information economy. It considers the historical development of information and knowledge production, issues related to control versus the free flow of information, the ethical and legal aspects of information management, and organizational use of information management for storing and processing information, managing knowledge, and making decisions.
FORMAT: Lecture
PREREQUISITES: At least third year standing

MGMT 3602   Professional Communication Skills
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course will introduce students to the broad range of written and oral communication skills needed by managers, including how to adapt a document or presentation for a particular audience and purpose, how to select a suitable method of organization, how to make good use of graphics, how to work effectively as part of a collaborative project team. Students will have the opportunity to practice their communication skills and techniques in small groups, and in formal presentations before the whole class.
FORMAT: Lecture
PREREQUISITES: Writing Requirement
EXCLUSIONS: COMM 1702.03, ENGL 2100.03, ENGL 2110.03, CSCI 2100.03, EGLA 1003.03, (COMM 1710.03 and COMM 1720.03), (COMM 1711.03 and COMM 1712.03 and COMM 1715.03)

MGMT 3603   Beyond Google
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Contextually relevant information is essential to support decision making and strategic planning by individuals, groups and organizations. This course discusses the theory and practice of searching for information, from the level of needs assessment though to systematically scanning through electronic, print and human sources efficiently, effectively and ethically. The use of technologies to streamline search processes will be emphasized, as well as the behavioural, affective and cognitive aspects of human information behaviour.
FORMAT: Online Delivery
PREREQUISITES: At least third year standing

MGMT 3701   The Community as a Living Laboratory
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course introduces students to research, concepts and methods for understanding community sustainability across a spectrum of perspectives. In this course, the Halifax community serves as a living laboratory for exploring environmental, social and economic challenges and solutions for community sustainability. Working in groups, students apply evidence-bases approaches to case-based projects using mixed (qualitative and quantitative) research methods to help community organizations (governmental and non-governmental) grapple with real world problems. A variety of tools may be used including systems analysis, environmental audits, field surveys, questionnaires, interviews, and statistical analysis. Students then draw conclusions and make recommendations for improvements on the basis of their analysis, and present them in a final report and powerpoint presentation.
PREREQUISITES: ENVS 1100.03 and ENVS 1200.03 or SUST 2000.06 or SUST 2001.06 or MGMT 1702.03 and MGMT 2702.03 or MGMT 1301.03 and MGMT 1302.03
CROSS-LISTING: SUST 3701.03
EXCLUSIONS: ENVS 3502.03, SUST 3502.03

MGMT 3702   Sustainable Industries
CREDIT HOURS: 3
The course introduces students to concepts and methods for analyzing industrial sustainability through an interdisciplinary lens that highlights the necessity of including economic, social and environmental considerations. It also intends to deepen their understanding of: a) the business case (short term and long term) for industrial/corporate sustainability; b) the tools, techniques and strategies necessary to decouple economic growth of our business sectors from resource use and environmental degradation; and c) the key role that business and industry play in the sustainable development agenda. Using examples from various industrial settings, a range of management and policy mechanisms for ensuring resource sustainability are explored.
PREREQUISITES: MGMT 1702.03 and MGMT 2702.03 or MGMT 1301.03 and MGMT 1302.03 or SUST 2000.06 or SUST 2001.06 or ENVS 1100.03 and ENVS 1200.03 or ENVS 1000.06
CROSS-LISTING: ENVS 3702, SUST 3702

MGMT 3710   Doing Business in Emerging Markets
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is designed to give students an understanding of the traditional challenges and opportunities Canadian businesses face when expanding their business to emerging markets, including those in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Eastern and Central Europe. Through this course, students will be expected to acquire a holistic understanding of the political, cultural, social, and economic challenges companies face when considering the benefits of expanding and conducting business in emerging markets.
FORMAT: Lecture
PREREQUISITES: MGMT 2304 and MGMT 2401
CROSS-LISTING: COMM 3710

MGMT 3802   Public Policy
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course serves as an introduction to the public policy process with an emphasis on the interplay between policy and the four thematic areas of study and professional practice upon which the Faculty of Management has been formed – the private sector, the environment, the public sector and information technology. Students assume the role of a policy analyst during the course and pursue a policy problem of their choosing through the policy process that culminates in a policy project briefing and paper.
FORMAT: Lecture
PREREQUISITES: At least third year standing

MGMT 3810   Government Policy Toward Business
CREDIT HOURS: 3
The focus of this course is twofold: first, how governments shape business behaviour through policy, regulation, state ownership, and other forms of intervention; and secondly, why collaboration is a growing reality enjoining public sector and private sector organizations and the implications for each sector and society as a whole. The course aims to understand the fundamental difference between the public interest and the private interest and how such differences are sorted out through contemporary governance systems involving public, private and civic actors. While the emphasis will be on the Canadian environment, a comparative perspective will also be used in light of many issues that are increasingly transnational in scope. Students will be able to develop a critical view of government intervention and grow a sense of when and where government action is warranted and when and where it is not.
FORMAT: Lecture
PREREQUISITES: At least third year standing

MGMT 3902   Starting Lean
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course provides real world, hands-on learning on what it's like to actually build a scalable startup company. This is a practical course - essentially a lab, not a theory course providing experiential learning. You will work in teams learning how to turn a great idea into a great company. You will learn how to talk to customers, partners, and competitors, as you encounter the chaos and uncertainty of how a startup actually works. You'll learn how to use a business model canvas to brainstorm each element of a company. You will learn the importance of customer development and customer discovery to determine whether anyone other than you would want/use your product and what your ‘Minimum Viable Product’ (MVP) should look like. Each day will be a new adventure outside the classroom as you test each part of your business model, then share your hard earned knowledge with the rest of the class.
PREREQUISITES: At least third year standing
CROSS-LISTING: BUSI 5902.03

MGMT 3907   New Venture Creation Entrepreneurship
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is about entrepreneurial thinking and acting on it. By linking theory and practice, the course will expose students to the issues, problems and challenges of developing new ventures and provide students with the opportunity, within the framework of a formal class, to explore and develop venture ideas, testing their ideas assumptions, and most importantly how to act on ideas with the resources you have on hand. Experiential exercises enable the students to build their personal entrepreneurial strategy. identify an innovative idea, build their business model, gather resources, and present their business idea. The purpose of the course is to provide students a foundation from which they can act entrepreneurially for themselves or for the organization they work for.
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Discussion
  • Experiential Learning

PREREQUISITES: MGMT 2902.03
CROSS-LISTING: COMM 3307.03