Course Descriptions AGRI 5520   Plant Breeding Methods
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Genetic and statistical principles underlying modern plant breeding methods are introduced. Those principles will be reinforced through the use of computer models. Cultivar development techniques for self and cross-pollinated species are examined in detail. Applications of tissue culture, genetic engineering, and marker-facilitated selection are discussed. This course is open to students who have had introductory courses in genetics, plant breeding, statistics, and molecular biology.
NOTES: Fall semester
FORMAT COMMENTS: to be arranged with the instructors.

AGRI 5530   Nitrogen in Crop Production
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Students will study the transformations of N in air, soil, water, and plants, and consider crop requirements for N. Topics include the chemistry of N, the N cycle, N transformations in soil, N metabolism in plants, N transport in plants, N-fixation, N losses in agricultural systems, and an evaluation of N fertilizer in these systems.
NOTES: Next offered in 2016/2017
FORMAT COMMENTS: to be arranged with the instructors. Offered in alternate years; next offered in 2016/2017.

AGRI 5540   Special Topics in Crop Physiology (A)
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is designed to meet the specific needs of graduate students specializing in the area of Crop Physiology who need further specific knowledge and/or skills.
NOTES: Fall or Winter semester
FORMAT COMMENTS: to be arranged with the instructors.
PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor and Faculty Graduate Coordinator

AGRI 5560   Advanced Crop Physiology
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Physiological processes relevant to crop plant development and production of harvestable yield will be examined.
NOTES: Summer semester
FORMAT COMMENTS: to be arranged with the instructor. Offered in alternate years; next offered in 2015/2016.

AGRI 5570   Special Topics in Agricultural Biotechnology
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is designed to meet the specific needs of graduate students specializing in the area of Agricultural Biotechnology who need further specific knowledge and/or skills.
NOTES: Fall or Winter semester
FORMAT COMMENTS: to be arranged with the instructor.
PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor and Faculty Graduate Coordinator

AGRI 5610   Special Topics in Animal Product Technology
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course will review areas important in the technology of foods derived from animals (meat, fish, eggs, milk). Such areas could include chemistry (lipid oxidation, Maillard reactions), physics (changes caused by freezing, sol-gel conversion, colour) and microbiology (spoilage, pathogenic organisms, modified-atmosphere packaging, HACCP). Each student will be expected to present a review of a particular topic.
NOTES: Fall semester
FORMAT COMMENTS: to be arranged with the instructors.
PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor and Faculty Graduate Coordinator

AGRI 5620   Ruminant Digestive Physiology and Metabolism
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is designed to provide an intensive study of food intake and digestion, and nutrient absorption and metabolism, in the ruminant animal. The course details current knowledge and focuses on aspects of future research interest. Students are expected to contribute to discussions and present reviews to the class on various aspects of the subject.
NOTES: Fall semester
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Lab

FORMAT COMMENTS: Offered in alternate years; next offered in 2013/2014.
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 2
PREREQUISITES: NUTR 3000, CHMA 3006
CROSS-LISTING: NUTR 4000

AGRI 5630   Intermediate Statistical Methods
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Analysis of single-factor experiments, randomized blocks, latin squares, and factorial and two-level fractional factorial designs.
NOTES: Fall semester
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Lab

FORMAT COMMENTS: computer lab 1 hour.
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
PREREQUISITES: STAA 3000.03, or permission of the instructor
CROSS-LISTING: STAA 4000.03

AGRI 5650   Applied Weed Science
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This is a lecture and laboratory based course designed to introduce students to the advanced principles of weed science and vegetation management. The course will build upon the foundation created in BIOA3002 and is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills critical for competency and knowledge generation in the field of weed science. Emphasis will be placed on crop-weed competition, managing weeds in annual and perennial cropping systems, determining the fate of herbicides in plants and soils, knowledge of herbicide mode of action and injury symptomology, examination of herbicide application technology, approaches to trouble shooting when field scouting, and management of aquatic weed species.
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Lab

LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 3
PREREQUISITES: BIOA 3002
EXCLUSIONS: ENVA 4003

AGRI 5660   FOOD MICROBIOLOGY
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is designed to teach students basic and advanced aspects of the microbiology of foods. A combination of lectures and laboratory exercises will be used to provide students with a theoretical and practical knowledge of food microbiology. The focus will be on the role of microorganisms in quality, safety, preservation and shelf life of food products. The occurrence and prevalence of foodborne pathogenic microorganisms will be examined. Food associated microbiomes and emerging food pathogens will be discussed. Methods to detect food related microorganisms will be compared and quality assurance and sanitation strategies to control the microbiological quality and safety of foods will be discussed. Laboratory portion of the course will incorporate molecular biology techniques for detection of food-related microorganisms and fermentation processes including wine and soft cheese preparation. Discussion of specific examples of microbial processes in food will be incorporated.
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Lab

LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 3
EXCLUSIONS: MCRA 4001

AGRI 5661   MICROBIOMES IN AGRICULTURE
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is to provide students with an understanding of diversity and function of microbial communities in soil, water and food. The students will be introduced to various concepts of plant- and animal- microbiome and the role microbial populations in host health and fitness. Application of microbiomes in food industry will be discussed. The theory of metagenomics approaches to culture independent microbial community profiling will be discussed. The students will work on analysis of current publications on the subject and develop research project on the evaluations of microbial communities in environmental niches
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Lab
  • Tutorial
  • Seminar

LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
EXCLUSIONS: MCRA 4002

AGRI 5700X/Y    Communication Skills and Graduate Seminar
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Through practical assignment, students will be able to test and develop their communication skills. Topics will include review, criticism, and writing of journal papers, grant applications, posters, seminars, lectures, and interviews. This course is required for students enrolled in the M.Sc. in Agriculture program.
NOTES: Fall and Winter semesters – Enrollment per term may be capped.

AGRI 5705   Module Course
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course normally consists of three modules. Each module consists of one month of lectures (approximately 8 to 12 hours of direct contact time) and additional assignments dealing with a topic in the lecturer’s area of expertise. Research interests of incoming students are taken into account each year when module topics are solicited. Students should not apply to take a module unless they have at least a second-year undergraduate background in the focus area. A formal evaluation is made at the end of each module.
NOTES: Students registering for this module course must complete three modules over their program for full course credit. Until all three modules are completed the course will register as 'In Progress'. A final mark will be assigned once all modules have been completed.
FORMAT: Experiential Learning
FORMAT COMMENTS: Will vary based on instructor

AGRI 5720   Applied Statistics and Experimental Design for Agriculture
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is designed to provide practical skills in statistical methods and experimental designs, and an appreciation of situations when more complex models and methods are required. Topics include linear and nonlinear regression, split-plot designs, repeated measures, and response surface methods. Students will be expected to successfully complete practical exercises and a project involving real experimental problems and data sets. Students will also be expected to acquire proficiency in at least one advanced statistical software package.
NOTES: Winter semester
PREREQUISITES: STAA 4000.03, AGRI 5630.03, or equivalent

AGRI 5730   Directed Studies in Food and BioProduct Science
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course aims to provide to graduate students an opportunity for detailed study and critical thinking in a food and bioproduct research area of interest. Through individual study and research, with guidance and instruction provided by a professor, students will leave the course with comprehensive knowledge of a contemporary topic(s) in the discipline, and with improved skills in comprehension, problem formulation, writing/communication and critical thinking.
NOTES: Fall or Winter semester
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Discussion

FORMAT COMMENTS: to be arranged with the instructor (individual work with instructor).
PREREQUISITES: Permission of the instructor and Faculty Graduate Coordinator

AGRI 5740   Advanced Studies in Food Chemistry
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is designed to allow graduate students to explore in detail various aspects of the chemical nature of agri-food products. This may include, but is not limited to, a study of naturally occurring components (functional foods and nutraceuticals), nutritional changes during value added processing, and product formulation. The exact focus of the course will depend on the expressed interest of students in the course.
NOTES: Fall or Winter semester
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Discussion

FORMAT COMMENTS: to be arranged with the instructor – discussion 1 hour per week.
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 1
PREREQUISITES: One undergraduate food science course or equivalent

AGRI 5750   Biotechnology
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is to provide students with general information on the theory and technologies that are currently used in biotechnology. Course topics will include gene identification, transformation and expression regulations, tissue culture and cell culture techniques, and other genomics-related agricultural applications. Nutraceutical and pharmaceutical applications will also be discussed.
NOTES: Fall semester
FORMAT: Lecture
FORMAT COMMENTS: Lecture 3 hours. Offered in alternate years; next offered in 2015/2016.
PREREQUISITES: GENE 2000 or equivalent
CROSS-LISTING: GENE 4003

AGRI 5770   Mathematical Modelling for Biosystems
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Mathematical modelling of biosystems, including deterministic and probabilistic models used n soils research, water management, plant and animal science and food production will be covered. Relationships between empirical/experimental data, suggested prediction models, solving and validating mathematical models will be included, using modelling techniques of relevance to the life sciences and engineering.
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Lab

PREREQUISITES: MTHA 1001.03, STAA 2000.03 or equivalent
CROSS-LISTING: MTHA 4000.03

AGRI 5780   Agriculture, Food and Well-being
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course develops learners' understanding and skills in criticality, synthesizing, and systems thinking through the examination of local and global issues in agriculture, food, and well-being. The intersections of agricultural systems and policies, animal and plant science, food production and processing, etc., and the social sciences are investigated to obtain a deeper understanding of systems that support agriculture, food, and well-being.
FORMAT: Lecture
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
PREREQUISITES: AGRI 1001.03
CROSS-LISTING: AGRI 4001.03

AGRI 5781   Advanced Topics in Consumer Behavior
CREDIT HOURS: 3
The study of consumer research attempts to explain and predict how humans think and behave in consumption situations. Beyond its business management implementation, a deep understanding of consumer behaviour is critical knowledge for making many, if not all, social changes and can be applied to many research areas, such as public health, economics, policy making, and community development. Built on studies from marketing, psychology and economics literature, this course systematically introduces students to advanced consumer behaviour theories. This course provides students with a comprehensive and in-depth understanding of current conceptual and methodological development in the field of consumer research. Specifically anchored to the agri-food sector and applicable to broader consumption behaviors, the discussions include food-related attitudes, motivations, values, and preferences, as well as issues related to healthy eating and food business ethics.
FORMAT: Lecture
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3