Course Descriptions CANA 1102   Halifax and the World: Part I
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course offers an introduction to both International Development Studies and Canadian Studies by exploring the connections between important global issues and your daily life as a student in Halifax. As you walk across the Dalhousie campus and go about daily life in Halifax, your actions connect you to people around the globe and to the history of the city and world as well as to the many works of literature, art and music that depict these connections. Here are just a few examples of connections that we will explore in Halifax and the World: Part I (INTD / CANA 1102.03):▪ Walking across the Dalhousie campus you are traversing what remains unceded Mi'kmaq territory raising hard questions about relations between Settler and First Nations Peoples.▪ While walking downtown on a Friday night you might tread in the footsteps of the central characters in Hugh MacLennan's novel Barometer Rising and other major works of Canadian fiction.▪ As you walk through the city you'll see monuments and statues that commemorate the city's early colonial leaders – which raise questions about how we chose to remember history of the city and its connections to the world.The course will critically examine the connections between daily life in Halifax and broader issues of colonialism, race and class relations, historical memory, ethics and justice through a combination of lectures, guest speakers, discussion groups, field trips, experiential learning in the city of Halifax. Assignments include written reflections on specific sites in Halifax which students are expected to visit and explore, a public engagement project, and a series of quizzes (there is no final exam).
CROSS-LISTING: INTD 1102.03
EXCLUSIONS: INTD 1100, INTD 1101

CANA 1103   Halifax and the World: Part II
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course builds on INTD/CANA 1102.03 (Halifax and the World: Part I) with a continued focus on the connections between important global issues and your daily life as a student in Halifax. In the winter semester, the course will focus on connections between life in Halifax and global development issues in other parts of the world. In particular, the course will highlight the ‘commodity chains' that connect our daily consumption decisions to other people around the world who are involved in the life cycle of those commodities – from their production through to their disposal. The course will also specifically address the ethical questions and challenges that emerge from these connections and the practical ways in which we might respond to those questions. As in the first semester, the course will involve a combination of lectures, guest speakers, discussion groups, field trips, and experiential learning in the city of Halifax. The assignments will include written reflections on specific sites in Halifax which students are expected to visit and explore, a public engagement project, and a series of quizzes (there is no final exam).
CROSS-LISTING: INTD 1103.03
EXCLUSIONS: INTD 1100. INTD 1101

CANA 2001   The Idea of Canada: Social and Political Perspectives
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course employs an interdisciplinary approach to focus on selected themes in Canadian history and society. It explores developments before and after the arrival and European peoples, and focuses on the rise and the impact of settler colonialism. It examines major events in the formation of Canada, and gives students the opportunity to work directly with primary sources. Themes may include, but are not restricted to: Indigenous history and culture; imperial influences and colonialism; political and constitutional reform; bilingualism and multiculturalism; nationalism and ethnic conflict; globalization and protest movements.
NOTES: Course is open to first-year students.
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Discussion

EXCLUSIONS: CANA 2000X

CANA 2002   The Idea of Canada: Cultural and Literary Perspectives
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course employs an interdisciplinary approach to focus on selected themes in Canadian history and society. Beginning with the premise that a nation is fundamentally a “narration,” it asks: What sorts of stories do Canadians tell about themselves? Thus the course is centered on important texts - novels, poems, films, songs, and political documents - that relate formative events in Canadian history and that point to new, sometimes contested, directions for the future. Themes may include, but are not restricted to: First Nation's history and culture; multiculturalism; wilderness; the north; regional identity; and foreign policy.
NOTES: Course is open to first-year students
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Discussion

EXCLUSIONS: CANA 2000Y

CANA 2004   Canadian Literature
CREDIT HOURS: 3
From early exploration narratives to contemporary fiction, this course will survey a wide range of key texts in the development of Canadian literature in English. It will consider the literary and historical contexts that inform our readings, and identify and interrogate the various myths, images, icons and institutions that structure our ideas of what it means to be Canadian.
PREREQUISITES: Completion of 6.0 credit hours at the 1000 level in ENGL, CRWR, KING or PERF
CROSS-LISTING: ENGL 2004.03
EXCLUSIONS: ENGL 2207.03

CANA 2005   Introduction to African Canadian Studies: Society, History and Culture
CREDIT HOURS: 3
There has been a presence of African peoples in Canada for over 400 years; however, the rich histories of African-Canadian people have been often ignored. This course examines African Canadian society and culture from the historical to contemporary period. Topics will include patterns of immigration and settlement, slavery, family, continental African and diasporic connections, identity, arts and culture, education, religion, employment, justice and the law, the media, diasporic debates, Black struggles and resistance, and African Canadian achievements. The course will be taught from a critical race and gender perspective, and will include readings about the diverse Black communities across Canada.
FORMAT: Lecture
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
CROSS-LISTING: SOSA 2005.03
EXCLUSIONS: CANA 2115.03; SOSA 2115.03

CANA 2021   Language and Culture
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Normally follows FREN 1045X/Y.06 or 1050X/Y.06, and is taken in the second year of study. This course provides the opportunity to practice and improve language skills (vocabulary and grammar) already acquired. Each year sections offer topics from the options listed below. Each section focuses upon a broad cultural topic via which language skills are developed. No prior knowledge of the topic is supposed. Various readings lead to discussions and oral presentations. Descriptions for sections offered in a specific year may be obtained in April from the Department. All courses and assignments are entirely in French. A maximum of two sections may be taken under the course designation of FREN 2021.03 and 2022.03. Approved in part with Canadian Studies. Contact French Department for details.
PREREQUISITES: FREN 1045X/Y.06 or 1050X/Y.06, or 2000-level Placement Test result, or instructor’s permission
CROSS-LISTING: FREN 2021.03

CANA 2022   Language and Culture
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Normally follows FREN 1045X/Y.06 or FREN 1050X/Y.06. This course provides the opportunity to practise and improve language skills (vocabulary and grammar) already acquired. Each year sections offer topics from the options listed under FREN 2021.03. Each section focuses upon a broad cultural topic via which language skills are developed. No prior knowledge of the topic is supposed. Various readings lead to discussions and oral presentations. Descriptions for sections offered in a specific year may be obtained in April from the Department. All courses and assignments are entirely in French. A maximum of two sections may be taken under the course designation of FREN 2021.03 and FREN 2022.03. Approved in part with Canadian Studies. Contact French Department for details.
PREREQUISITES: FREN 1045X/Y.06 or 1050X/Y.06, or 2000-level Placement Test result, or instructor’s permission
CROSS-LISTING: FREN 2022.03

CANA 2050   Historical Issues in Indigenous Studies
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the history of encounters and relationships between indigenous peoples and European settlers in Canada. Topics may include treatise, colonial policy, residential schools, child welfare, resettlement, and the Indian Act. This course provides the necessary background to understand contemporary Indigenous issues.
CROSS-LISTING: INDG 2050.03, HIST 2205.03
EXCLUSIONS: TYPR 1750 and TYPR 1751

CANA 2052   Contemporary Issues in Indigenous Studies
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course offers an interdisciplinary introduction to contemporary challenges faced by Indigenous peoples in Canada. Topics may include language and culture, land rights, economics, governance and treaty relationships, child welfare and education, health, social services, environmental issues, violence, criminal justice and self-determination, political mobilization and resistance, and decolonization.
FORMAT:
  • Lecture
  • Discussion

LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
PREREQUISITES: Recommended: CANA 2050.03 or HIST 2205.03
CROSS-LISTING: INDG 2052.03, SOSA 2052.03

CANA 2111   Is there an Atlantic Canada?
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course will examine the historical and contemporary social issues related to the Maritimes and Atlantic Provinces. The course will critically question what is meant by "Atlantic Canada" and look at itssocial, demographic, economic, and cultural trends in relation to the rest of the country. Attention will be given to the role of Acadiens, Mi'kmaq, and African Nova Scotians as well as dominant powerholders in the construction of Atlantic Canada.
PREREQUISITES: One SOSA course at the 1000 level or FYP
CROSS-LISTING: SOSA 2111.03

CANA 2207   Indigenous Peoples and Empires: Canada's Origins to 1763
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course explores Canada’s origins to 1763. It covers the history of Indigenous peoples before and after the arrival of Europeans. It addresses themes such as the role of the physical environment; the fur, fish, and timber trades; and the imperial struggle for dominance in North America. While the lectures will narrate the major developments in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the tutorials will focus on specific issues, such as the role of treaties in Canadian history. The course climaxes with the Conquest of Quebec and the end of the Seven Years War.
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 2207.03

CANA 2208   Patriots, Rebels, Refugees: Canada’s roots in the Age of Revolution, 1763 to 1860
CREDIT HOURS: 3
As empires continued their international contest and Britain fought to maintain colonies within North America, old and new inhabitants of what would become Canada also wrestled with questions concerning who would exercise power within their communities and governing bodies. In the process they gave new and, at times, conflicting answers to old questions: what did it mean to be a patriot? who and what were they willing to defend? who and what were they prepared to resist? Immigrants, exiles and the refugees of European and North American wars shaped new homelands, even as the First Nations peoples became refugees within their own lands. In this course we explore the related questions of loyalty and conscience through the diaries and letters of men and women defining their place in a new order.
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 2208.03

CANA 2209   Making a Nation: Canada, 1860-1929
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This is the story of how British North America was transformed into a distinct nation-state for the twentieth century. We'll see how a young Canada grappled with geographical, political, and social challenges: acquiring enormous territories amid growing provincial differences; maintaining loyalties to Empire while developing a New World identity; reconciling new and diverse cultural communities; and mobilizing for war.
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 2209.03

CANA 2210   Many Canadas: Canada, 1930 to the present
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course explores the remaking of Canada, including the shift from imperial to continental and nationalist politics, the rise and transformation of third-party political movements, and theemergence of new ideas about the rights and responsibilities of the liberal individual subject.
FORMAT: Lecture
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 2210.03

CANA 2211   Social History of Canada before 1870
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This class examines the social history of pre-Confederation Canada through such topics as social control, violence and protest, women and domestic life, regionalism and marginal peoples, and the transformation of the economy.
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 2211.03
EXCLUSIONS: HIST 2210X/Y.06

CANA 2212   Social History of Canada since 1870
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This class examines the social history of Canada since Confederation through such topics as the impact of industrialization, social classes, conflict, the role of women, the state and social development, and relationships among the wide variety of social groups in Canada.
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 2212.03
EXCLUSIONS: HIST 2210X/Y.06

CANA 2218   Canadian Economy: Policy Issues
CREDIT HOURS: 3
Canada’s economy today faces many problems: unemployment, productivity, income distribution, environmental protection, trade relations, federal-provincial fiscal relations, maintenance of social programs, etc. What are the most important economic policy issues that Canada now faces? What is the appropriate policy role for government?
PREREQUISITES: ECON 1101.03, 1102.03
CROSS-LISTING: ECON 2218.03

CANA 2231   The Making of Modern Canada: Canadian Political History, 1896 to the Present
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This class surveys the major political developments in Canadian history since 1896. Topics to be examined include: regionalism and the emergence of third-party movements; French-English relations; federal-provincial relations; and the transformation of the liberal state in the post-1945 era.
FORMAT: Discussion
CROSS-LISTING: HIST 2231.03
EXCLUSIONS: HIST 2230

CANA 2233   Canadian Economic History
CREDIT HOURS: 3
An examination of the economic history of Canada from the time of Confederation to WWI. Major topics explored include: the economic reasons for Confederation, the building of the CPR, the Wheat Boom, foreign trade and investment and the roots of regional disparities.
CROSS-LISTING: ECON 2233.03